THE AGONY OF A BARREN WOMAN.

The pride and virtue in a woman,A thing given as a gift,I grew up a beautiful girl and then to a woman,A thing not as fast as travelling in a lift. It was a journey and I have been loved by every man,They know my worth, too precious a gift,And I gave it so willingly to my man,In my first night, it was not too swift, Even when I was scared by my man’s full glory, This was what mama told me, the joy of a virtuous woman. Alas! This is one thing I hate to believe,That people, my people think I were a baby machine,If I were still my beautiful damsel, oh what a relieve,Not to lose my four upper incisors. Oh wrinkles no my chin,Not to have thought of being a mother, a grandmother,Even great grandmother, the name I long to be called,But now changed to what I wouldn’t be called by a brother. If I smile, it appears as though I growled,My lost incisors, and the dirty molars so coined a name,Toothless witch, my name, I groan for its ignominuous fame. My mother-in-law though now in her grave, The only place she could rest after I married her son,Blamed me, I sent her to the world beyond,The same woman who threw her arms round my shoulders,And gave a welcome, a warm one no my wedding day,Died hating me for not giving her a grandchild. I’m fifty but I look much older than eighty,The sadness that mist me because of kinsmen’s hostility,Made me age faster than the rising sun,Hate to admit it; I wish I were never a woman. My husband, my dear husband who promised paradise,Who said I was his better half, his second coin face,Now accuses me, a desert, an infertile land. Names I despise,Thinking this, wrinkles now on my shamed face,How I wish I were never married! My kinsmen, my dear women,Help tell my in-laws and husband,My barrenness, not my fault, not if I know,Why I had become another Sarah and my husbandAnother Abraham! But those people’s hope andFulfilment, I hope; before I go to my grave,Will become mine. Adekanmi A. Solomon. @me_ablad no twitter